Hydrogen made in Mainz

The buzzword in Mainz is “power-to-gas” Hechtsheim’s “Energiepark Mainz” uses wind energy to manufacture “green” hydrogen. The project was created in 2015 by Siemens, Linde Group, and Mainzer Stadtwerke.

The concept: Hydrogen and oxygen may be separated from the water to provide environmentally beneficial energy that can be stored (electrolysis). Due to an excess of power in the system, wind turbines occasionally need to be turned off. This extra wind energy may be utilized at the “energy park” to create hydrogen, which can then be stored and used as needed.

Mainz, “HyExpert Region” The city is also making progress against the problem. As a result of the company’s participation in the “MaHYnzExperts” competition this year, which was promoted by the Federal Ministry of Transportation, Mainz has been given the right to call itself the “HyExpert-Region,” which is connected to a subsidy of 400,000 euros that Volker Hans (FDP), Head of Department for grant management, raised. The funds will be utilized to create fresh hydrogen ideas. “By the middle of next year, we will be able to identify our hydrogen demands and the storage needs that must be met. And eventually, as “HyPerformer 2023,” we may reapply for federal financing at the highest level. Former Bundestag member for Mainz Ursula Groden-Kranich is aware of this and says, “This is how we make Mainz a hydrogen city and Germany a hydrogen country. Because we also need to be able to replenish it locally if we want to, say, operate our city buses on green hydrogen. For instance, this occurs at the Wiesbaden hydrogen filling station, which is run by both municipal utilities.

Power coming from the sewage treatment facility

A firm established by the commercial enterprise and Stadtwerke Mainz is another foundation for the growth of the hydrogen infrastructure. This influences, among other things, how the Mombach sewage treatment facility’s proposed electrolysis plant is managed. The oxygen acquired is utilized in the fourth cleaning step to better purify the wastewater, and the hydrogen created there is to flow into the natural gas network of the public utility company.

A significant portion of the energy produced might be used to power trash trucks or hydrogen buses for public transportation. Additionally proposed is a hydrogen fueling station. For 900,000 euros at the start of the year, Mainz transportation purchased a hydrogen-powered bus. More details on the appropriateness of regular usage of public transportation should be available as a result. At the Wiesbaden transportation firm ESWE, the car gets refueled. The energy park at Hechtsheim provides the hydrogen for this.

According to the ranks of Mainz mobility, the general aim is to put a strong emphasis on environmentally friendly and resource-saving cars in the medium future. It is also evident that hydrogen-related technology is evolving quickly, thus test runs must be postponed for the time being. Even if they meet the strictest emissions standards, diesel cars are now impossible for the Mainz transport firm to avoid. Mainz transportation anticipates receiving 23 brand-new battery buses in the fall.

In addition, the municipal garbage disposal company’s fleet of vehicles is powered by hydrogen. Two trash trucks that use fuel cell technology will now deliver trash without producing any of their own. According to the city, each vehicle saves about 30 tons of CO2 annually. Both cars have received a 1.5 million euro subsidy from the federal government. that because hydrogen technology is evolving quickly, test runs must be postponed for the time being.

Even if they meet the strictest emissions standards, diesel cars are now impossible for the Mainz transport firm to avoid. Mainz transportation anticipates receiving 23 brand-new battery buses in the fall. In addition, the municipal garbage disposal company’s fleet of vehicles is powered by hydrogen. Two trash trucks that use fuel cell technology will now deliver trash without producing any of their own. According to the city, each vehicle saves about 30 tons of CO2 annually.

Both cars have received a 1.5 million euro subsidy from the federal government. that because hydrogen technology is evolving quickly, test runs must be postponed for the time being. Even if they meet the strictest emissions standards, diesel cars are now impossible for the Mainz transport firm to avoid. Mainz transportation anticipates receiving 23 brand-new battery buses in the fall. In addition, the municipal garbage disposal company’s fleet of vehicles is powered by hydrogen.

Two trash trucks that use fuel cell technology will now deliver trash without producing any of their own. According to the city, each vehicle saves about 30 tons of CO2 annually. Both cars have received a 1.5 million euro subsidy from the federal government. Even if they meet the strictest emissions standards, diesel cars are now impossible for the Mainz transport firm to avoid. Mainz transportation anticipates receiving 23 brand-new battery buses in the fall. In addition, the municipal garbage disposal company’s fleet of vehicles is powered by hydrogen.

Two trash trucks that use fuel cell technology will now deliver trash without producing any of their own. According to the city, each vehicle saves about 30 tons of CO2 annually. Both cars have received a 1.5 million euro subsidy from the federal government. Even if they meet the strictest emissions standards, diesel cars are now impossible for the Mainz transport firm to avoid. Mainz transportation anticipates receiving 23 brand-new battery buses in the fall. In addition, the municipal garbage disposal company’s fleet of vehicles is powered by hydrogen.

Two trash trucks that use fuel cell technology will now deliver trash without producing any of their own. According to the city, each vehicle saves about 30 tons of CO2 annually. Both cars have received a 1.5 million euro subsidy from the federal government. In addition, the municipal garbage disposal company’s fleet of vehicles is powered by hydrogen. Two trash trucks that use fuel cell technology will now deliver trash without producing any of their own. According to the city, each vehicle saves about 30 tons of CO2 annually.

Both cars have received a 1.5 million euro subsidy from the federal government. In addition, the municipal garbage disposal company’s fleet of vehicles is powered by hydrogen. Two trash trucks that use fuel cell technology will now deliver trash without producing any of their own. According to the city, each vehicle saves about 30 tons of CO2 annually. Both cars have received a 1.5 million euro subsidy from the federal government.

Infrastructure

A hydrogen network of five kilometers from the Ingelheimer Aue to the Mainz main station is also under study. The lines might guarantee Mainz’s mobility and the supply of industrial clients. Additionally, the new network might get hydrogen from existing providers. “The network infrastructure can significantly help decarbonize, or convert less carbon, the sectors of industry and heavy goods traffic in Mainz and the Rhine-Main region. An essential stepping stone toward a competitive, carbon-free economy,” says Tobias Brosze, Technical Director of Mainzer Stadtwerke. However, because the initiative has not yet been funded by the federal government, it cannot be put into action at this time. Municipal utilities intend to remain with it and reapply for one of the upcoming funding initiatives. Additionally, there is an active pilot project.

with the Mainz-based Schott glass company. By 2030, the corporation wants to achieve carbon neutrality. The group will test the hydrogen admixture in large-scale melting tests in a furnace at the Mainz facility starting in the fall of 2022; the municipal utility will run the hydrogen-natural gas mixing plant. The test represents ground-breaking work for the glass sector. In the upcoming months, Stadtwerke will also launch a pilot project in Mainz-Kostheim to run a paper machine using green hydrogen that is CO2-free in partnership with the hygiene and health firm Essity.

An example region

Malu Dreyer, the prime minister of Rhineland-Palatinate, is presently aiming to transform the entire federal state into a “model territory for green hydrogen.” She educated herself on the potential for extending the liquid gas structures as well as the creation of hydrogen using renewable energy sources in Antwerp and Zeebruge. The Prime Minister stated, “We want to establish the conditions so that Pfalz can become an important distribution hub and feed the energy-intensive sector with hydrogen. This is made possible by our location in Germany, our proximity to Belgium, and the Rhine as a transport route. In the near and medium future, it appears that the Rhineland-Palatinate economy will produce and utilize energy in different ways than in the past.