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Sumitomo Corporation, a Japanese conglomerate, is considering plans to construct a first-of-its-kind hydrogen plant in Oman in collaboration with a local upstream energy company, boosting the Sultanate’s aspirations to become a global hub for hydrogen production as a zero-carbon energy source.

Sumitomo Corporation has begun a feasibility study with ARA Petroleum LLC, an Omani oil and gas producer, to investigate the feasibility of developing a hydrogen hybrid project in the Sultanate, with the hydrogen production earmarked primarily for the operation of electric vehicles. This comes after the two sides signed a Memorandum of Undersigned in March of last year.

The groundbreaking project revolves around a plan to establish a hydrogen supply chain focused on local hydrogen production and use, as well as other byproducts, at one of ARA Petroleum’s existing hydrocarbon production sites in the Sultanate.

The Zubair Corporation owns 100% of ARA Petroleum, which runs the adjoining Blocks 44 and 31 in the country’s northwest. Block 44 has long been a source of hydrocarbons, mostly natural gas, thanks to its producing Shams field.

The proposed project includes a ‘blue hydrogen’ portion, which includes a hydrogen production facility that will produce about 300-400 tonnes of hydrogen per year from flare gas produced on site.

This energy source will primarily be used as a fuel for the electric vehicles that ARA Petroleum aims to launch as part of its business.

According to Sumitomo, carbon dioxide (CO2) produced as a byproduct of the process will be used in local industries. Significantly, the plant will be powered by a 20 megawatt solar photovoltaic (PV) photovoltaic (PV) photovoltaic (PV) photovoltaic (PV) photovoltaic (PV) photovoltaic (PV) photovoltaic (PV) photovoltaic (PV)

Arnes Biogradlija
Creative Content Director at EnergyNews.Biz

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