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HyP SA hydrogen will be delivered to Whyalla

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The potential of locally produced hydrogen will be shown through the delivery of renewable hydrogen produced at Hydrogen Park South Australia (HyP SA) in Adelaide to Whyalla.

Cooperation between Australian Gas Networks, a division of Australian Gas Infrastructure Group (AGIG), and BOC, a Linde firm, will begin this week with the collection of shipments of up to 370 kg of renewable gas from HyP SA’s plant at Tonsley Innovation District.

The Whyalla steelworks and nearby industry will receive high-purity argon produced using green hydrogen. This is anticipated to be the first of many weekly supplies to Steel City from HyP SA, which has a capacity to generate about 175 tonnes of hydrogen annually.

The present Victoria-based supplies to BOC’s South Australian clients will be replaced by the new Adelaide-based hydrogen supply chain, saving about 122,000 kg of carbon emissions annually and removing the expenses of 117,000 km of yearly transportation. More than 700 residences in Mitchell Park have been receiving up to 5% mixed renewable gas thanks to HyP SA since May 2021. It will provide more than 3000 dwellings in the nearby suburbs by the end of this year.

With an ambitious goal of converting to 100% renewable gas by 2040 and no later than 2050, AGIG aspires to offer at least 10% renewable gas across its distribution networks by 2030.

The first of several renewable hydrogen projects AGIG is constructing around Australia is HyP SA at Tonsley.

“This is an amazing insight into the future potential of renewable hydrogen generated right here in South Australia,” stated Peter Malinauskas, the premier of South Australia.

“Renewable hydrogen is a crucial component of our transition to a sustainable energy future, and this innovative project is assisting companies in expanding the potential of renewable hydrogen. The facility’s practical use supports the growing public understanding of hydrogen’s advantages.

Arnes Biogradlija
Creative Content Director at EnergyNews.Biz

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